The good news is that you will still be able to choose how much power you exactly need. What is cloud hosting offering here? It’s pretty simple. You can choose from multiple providers offering different plans - the difference being the amount of RAM, the power of the CPU and so on. You choose how much you want. It is very upgradeable. Cloud server hosting puts the power in your hands.
VPS and cloud computing are not mutually exclusive options. You can host your VPS in a virtualized environment. This allows you to convert one physical server into multiple virtual machines, each of which acts like a unique physical device for running both IT resources and web applications in a flexible, instantly scalable and cost-efficient manner.
A cloud server is a shared section of a server. It’s allocated for your use (via a virtual environment) and controlled by the service or cloud provider. On your end, it appears that you are running your own compute and storage space. However—and this is an important point—there are usually a large number of other people using the same compute and storage resources within their own virtualized environment.
By definition, cloud computing is the practice of using a network of remote servers hosted on the Internet to store, manage, and process data, rather than a local server or a personal computer. While a local machine can be used to access the cloud, the intent is that the environment is remote thus removing the need for local resources for storage, management, and processing of data.
The tech giant IBM also points to the great scalability of cloud hosting. As the technology progresses, servers become more efficient, using less energy to handle the same number of tasks. Many companies still use old and inefficient servers. They often sit idle, use energy, are technologically less advanced and have weak cooling systems. Instead of keeping the same dedicated servers or upgrading them, many companies would strongly benefit from moving to cloud hosting.
If you read our last post on business continuity planning, you know that a failed server can have catastrophic effects on your business. But let’s assume you already have a sound business continuity plan in place, and you know what you’re going to do if that server fails. What should you consider when it comes to choosing the right server for your business in the first place?
Speaking of storage, we've discovered that cloud hosts typically offer hard drives or solid-state drives that range between 100GB and 200GB in size. That said, you'll occasionally discover a web host that boasts unlimited storage. (Again, the usual caveats apply with regards to "unlimited" anything.) Solid-state drives are typically faster than their hard-drive-based counterparts, but are typically smaller in terms of storage capacity. If you're looking for sheer volume, a traditional hard drive is the way to go.
Rather than being hosted on one single instances of a physical server, hosting is delivered on a virtual partition which draws its resource, such as disk space, from an extensive network of underlying physical servers. If one server goes offline it will have no effect on availability, as the virtual servers will continue to pull resource from the remaining network of servers. 
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