The security of VPS hosting is almost on par with that of a dedicated physical server. The VPS is independent of any other VPSes on the same physical host, as if it were a separate machine, but poor security measures taken by the owner of one VPS could affect others on the same physical server. However, this possibility is much less likely than with shared hosting. The centralized location of the physical host offers added security to those operations with critical data whose location must be known and restricted to comply with data security regulations.
There is a lot of talk these days about cloud computing or cloud hosting. Many companies are using these terms loosely to discuss either VPS or cloud servers (public or private). But, what do these terms mean? You will definitely see a difference when you look at the price tag, so understanding what each of these services are will help you in your quest to determine the best option for you or your company.
An increasingly popular configuration that many companies are using is called a “hybrid cloud.” A hybrid cloud uses dedicated and cloud hosting solutions. A hybrid may also mix private and public cloud servers with colocated servers. This configuration allows for multiple variations on the customization side which is attractive to businesses that have specific needs or budgetary constraints.
A virtual server can be created in a matter of seconds, quite literally. It can also be dismissed as quickly when it is no longer needed. Sending resources to a virtual server is a simple matter as well, requiring no in-depth hardware modifications. Flexibility is one of the primary advantages of cloud hosting, and it is a characteristic that is essential to the idea of the cloud server.
Yes! Thanks to the incredible performance of KVM technology, OpenStack, and Ceph. Where a traditional VPS would rely on a half-dozen or more RAID drives locally (all SSD), it doesn't handle as many IOPS as the massively parallel handling of Ceph distributed storage. While 6 RAID SSD drives can be very, very fast, when it comes to larger numbers of accounts on a box - Ceph creates a gigantic pooled pipeline to assorted SSD's, perhaps hundreds, in order to make transfers at a blistering pace.
Deploy your vps with (webuzo) a powerful control panel available for free. Then instantly provision 100s of the most popular web applications. Such as WordPress, Magento, Joomla, Prestashop, and Drupal. Take your development goals to the next level by adding services such as Apache, PHP, Ruby, Rails, Java, and Node.JS. Instantly deploy database with MySQL, MongoDb and MarinaDB. Along with additional modules such as Memcache and Varnish.
Cloud computing solutions provide users with on-demand services. These services are available directly thanks to the industrialization of delivery systems. After you've selected the service you want, you submit your request to a system that processes it directly, without human intervention. This high-level automation delivers a fast, self-service model. Otherwise known as "service on demand" or "as a Service" (*aaS) in the context of infrastructure (IaaS), a platform (PaaS) or software (SaaS).
In the Cloud, there is an option to integrate additional resources if needed. RAM, disc space, or bandwidth, etc., can be added with few clicks and dismissed when no longer needed without financial loss. Thus, Cloud hosting can also be defined as a web hosting solution that provides resources on demand. It is dynamically scalable and customizable according to the needs of the customer. No large investments are required. Unnecessary resources can be removed without any cancellation or further fees.
The security of cloud hosting is also quite high. Your server is completely separated from other clients, as with a VPS. However, the web-based nature of the infrastructure might make it vulnerable to attacks since it is physically distributed and thus harder to secure. In addition, since the data is housed in many locations, it may not be possible to comply with some regulations on data security.

Cloud hosting is the latest form of hosting that has become extremely popular over the past few years. The main concept of cloud hosting is "Divide and Rule" – the resources required for maintaining your website are spread across a cluster of servers that work together, termed as "the cloud". This greatly reduces chances of any downtimes in case of a server malfunction.
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Here’s an example of a SysGen hybrid model. As you can see, the client has an onsite server with local backup storage. Employees access their desktops, applications, files, printers, and email from the office using the local network. At the same time, data is backed up for redundancy to a cloud-based solution, and email is entirely in the cloud with Hosted Microsoft Exchange. The cloud configuration also gives employees anywhere access to their desktops, applications, files, printers, and email. (Click the photo to enlarge it).
In each of our reviews, we devote an entire section to uptime, it's so important. Simply put, if your site is down, clients or customers will be unable to find your business or access your products or services. They may find what they're looking for elsewhere, and never return. At the very least, customers will be annoyed, and it won't help their image of your business. Neither is a good outcome.
Customization with cloud hosting expands to include the possibility to tweak network architecture, firewalls, load balancing, and IP addresses. However, the need to distribute functioning across many servers may leave less control over some hosting settings. Both Windows and Linux clouds are readily available, so you will get your choice of OS. Because a cloud environment is more complex, it may require more technical expertise to configure, especially to gain the full advantages of the cloud network.
Data centers use from 1 to 2 percent of world’s electricity. And only around a quarter of our current energy is renewable - there are still plenty types of conventional power used in order to get electricity. Examples of such ways are coal, oil, gas or nuclear energy. In turn, this means that the more servers there are, the more electricity they use. Because most our energy comes from conventional sources, servers increase our carbon footprint. In fact, a CLEER model simulation (a tool by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Northwestern University) published in Scientific American reveals an interesting fact. If all US companies would move their spreadsheet, email apps, customer management software and similar programs to the cloud, that would save enough a lot of energy. How much exactly? Enough to fully power the city of Los Angeles!
The Cloud Platform is Liquid Web’s proprietary cloud computing solution based on KVM, Linux’s Kernel-based Virtual Machine. It offers scalable, virtualized resources as a service, purchased on a utility basis. In other words, you pay for what you use. You get dynamic provisioning in a scalable, virtual environment. Resources needed for most projects are available in minutes, giving near-instant access on a new server. Best of all: you can do this without the need of migrating your data or changing your server settings.

With shared hosting, which is more common among small and medium sized businesses, the client pays for a set amount of space (storage) on a single server, and that server’s resources are shared by a number of other websites. It’s a cost-efficient, low-maintenance way to host a website or application, and the hosting company is responsible for managing, maintaining, and updating the units.
As Microsoft Azure becomes an increasingly popular cloud choice, there is growing evidence on how enterprises can increase the value they gain from Azure. In this guide for migrating to Azure, Navisite has identified 12 key learnings from scores of Azure deployments. Discover the steps to avoid common migration pitfalls and achieve the right level of transparency and control when working … Continue Reading...

Rather than being hosted on one single instances of a physical server, hosting is delivered on a virtual partition which draws its resource, such as disk space, from an extensive network of underlying physical servers. If one server goes offline it will have no effect on availability, as the virtual servers will continue to pull resource from the remaining network of servers. 
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