Cloud hosting is a network of servers in multiple locations, which share data and resources among themselves. That reduces server load and increases performance. As the demand rises, clients can easily scale their plans. By doing so, they increase the performance of their cloud hosting in just a few clicks. Now, it’s quickly becoming more and more popular.
Cloud hosting assures high availability and uptime because of the multiple servers in a redundant system. If a server fails, its files and functional responsibilities are instantly migrated to another server with no downtime. Memory capacity and CPU power also expand on demand to meet your needs or compensate for those of another customer without impacting other users in the network. It is ideal for sites that may experience wide fluctuations in traffic volume.
There is a lot of talk these days about cloud computing or cloud hosting. Many companies are using these terms loosely to discuss either VPS or cloud servers (public or private). But, what do these terms mean? You will definitely see a difference when you look at the price tag, so understanding what each of these services are will help you in your quest to determine the best option for you or your company.
Liquid Web calls the scaling process resizing. Resizing scales your server resources up or down. Depending on the specific site or application needs, you can have the configuration you need in a short amount of time. Caveats to completion time include any running server processes, storage or memory used, and backups or other processes that are running. The two options for resizing are Quick Resize and Full Resize.
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VPS and cloud computing are not mutually exclusive options. You can host your VPS in a virtualized environment. This allows you to convert one physical server into multiple virtual machines, each of which acts like a unique physical device for running both IT resources and web applications in a flexible, instantly scalable and cost-efficient manner.
Data centers use from 1 to 2 percent of world’s electricity. And only around a quarter of our current energy is renewable - there are still plenty types of conventional power used in order to get electricity. Examples of such ways are coal, oil, gas or nuclear energy. In turn, this means that the more servers there are, the more electricity they use. Because most our energy comes from conventional sources, servers increase our carbon footprint. In fact, a CLEER model simulation (a tool by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Northwestern University) published in Scientific American reveals an interesting fact. If all US companies would move their spreadsheet, email apps, customer management software and similar programs to the cloud, that would save enough a lot of energy. How much exactly? Enough to fully power the city of Los Angeles!
Definitely. Because of the OpenStack based architecture, your hardware has redundancy built in, making it possible for an entire server failure to have zero data loss and so that the virtual machine can be booted onto new hardware in a matter of minutes. This, combined with backup snapshots and many configuration optimizations means that you won't find a more resilient platform than our Cloud VPS servers.

If you're looking for a real-time example of cloud hosting, what better example can someone give other than Google itself? The king of search engines has got its resources spread over hundreds of servers on the cloud, no wonder you've never seen Google.com facing any downtimes over past decade or so (I don't remember seeing it down – planned maintenance of services like AdSense and AdWords are a different affair altogether!)
White labeled KVM comes standard. This separates KnownHost from the rest of the industry. You can brand your server and there will be no mention of KnownHost. This feature is awesome for any company who needs to offer hosting or internet logins but doesn't want to sacrifice having their own brand name everywhere. We white label so you retain ownership, control and branding everywhere.

4 The amount of aggregate outbound bandwidth across all attached network interfaces (PublicNet, ServiceNet, Cloud Networks). The maximum amount of outbound public Internet bandwidth is limited to 50% of the aggregate limit. Inbound traffic is not limited. Host networking is redundant and bandwidth is delivered over two separate bonded interfaces, each able to carry 50% of the aggregate limit. We recommend using multiple Layer 4 connections to maximize throughput.
Our highly experienced team of technicians and system administrators is here around the clock to fix any potential problems with your cloud server. From day-to-day tasks such as server monitoring and backups to complicated software installations, our team will always be at your disposal so you can concentrate on managing your business while we manage your infrastructure and servers.
White labeled KVM comes standard. This separates KnownHost from the rest of the industry. You can brand your server and there will be no mention of KnownHost. This feature is awesome for any company who needs to offer hosting or internet logins but doesn't want to sacrifice having their own brand name everywhere. We white label so you retain ownership, control and branding everywhere.

We use Ceph Storage which provides a 3N level of redundancy. In regards to computing, it is completely distributed without any point of failure, scalable to the exabyte level and also freely available. It also replicates data and makes it fault-tolerant, and requires no specific hardware support. Ceph is designed to be both self-healing and self-managing, thus aiming to minimize administration time and other costs.
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