Cloud hosting sometimes gets confused with a virtual private server, or VPS. Both configurations rely on the virtualization of physical server resources. Although a cloud server can be called a VPS, a VPS is not a cloud server. One of the key differences, aside from the infrastructure configurations, is the payment model — the automation and vast network associated with cloud hosting enables providers to offer cheaper, pay-as-you-go solutions that can be scaled up or down at a moment’s notice.
White labeled KVM comes standard. This separates KnownHost from the rest of the industry. You can brand your server and there will be no mention of KnownHost. This feature is awesome for any company who needs to offer hosting or internet logins but doesn't want to sacrifice having their own brand name everywhere. We white label so you retain ownership, control and branding everywhere.
As a developer, you know there can be a lot of trial and error as you write code, develop sites and build software. Sometimes mistakes happen. It happens to the best of us! That's why you can rest assure because your account is backed by our 99.9% Uptime Commitment. That means you get ultimate peace of mind in addition to the best in hosting dependability.
There is a lot of talk these days about cloud computing or cloud hosting. Many companies are using these terms loosely to discuss either VPS or cloud servers (public or private). But, what do these terms mean? You will definitely see a difference when you look at the price tag, so understanding what each of these services are will help you in your quest to determine the best option for you or your company.
Liquid Web calls the scaling process resizing. Resizing scales your server resources up or down. Depending on the specific site or application needs, you can have the configuration you need in a short amount of time. Caveats to completion time include any running server processes, storage or memory used, and backups or other processes that are running. The two options for resizing are Quick Resize and Full Resize.
A VPS can be rebooted without affecting the other VPSes on that machine. You have a server operating system (OS) with root access, and you can install software as you would if you had a dedicated hosting plan with your own server. A portion of the physical host’s CPU and memory are dedicated to your VPS, but you also share additional resources with the other virtual servers.
Setting up your systems on a new cloud hosting plan isn’t for faint-hearted beginners. Many choose to avoid the virtualization complexities by opting for managed hosting services, which often include assistance for software installations and updates, security tools, and performance optimizations. Hosting specialists perform both the complicated and the mundane tasks required to maintain healthy infrastructure and application stacks.
You get to benefit from an economy of scale, meaning you sharing hardware with other businesses but only pay for the amount of compute and storage capacity that you use. If you need to increase your usage, you can do so through a dashboard. You have unlimited flexibility to increase or decrease your resources and can change server specifications with the demands of your business.
Our Quick Start Cloud means no confusing price guides and instructions to sift through just to get started. Just design your perfect Cloud and easily re-size your account as resource needs fluctuate. Our ultra-reliable service comes backed by our 99.9% Uptime Commitment. Don't settle for merely a top Cloud VPS Hosting provider; choose A2 Hosting for the Best Cloud VPS Hosting service.
Cloud hosting assures high availability and uptime because of the multiple servers in a redundant system. If a server fails, its files and functional responsibilities are instantly migrated to another server with no downtime. Memory capacity and CPU power also expand on demand to meet your needs or compensate for those of another customer without impacting other users in the network. It is ideal for sites that may experience wide fluctuations in traffic volume.
As a leader in Managed Services for public cloud infrastructure, here at Rackspace we deliver unbiased guidance on best-fit cloud solutions to organizations around the globe. We go beyond simple migration assistance and infrastructure management with multi-cloud managed services, professional services and managed application services to enable true digital transformation.
Cloud hosting provides significant capital and operational savings to organizations because they don't have to spend a lot on the initial upfront capital cost associated with owning and managing data centers. IT also has the ability to scale more efficiently, using and paying only for the resources they need. In addition, long-term data retention becomes a more simplified process, eliminating the costly management of disks and tape systems.
I've observed or been a part of buying decisions for a few thousand server customers, from small-business owners getting a website online for the first time to established platforms with tens of millions of visits every day. While each of those purchasers had different requirements and priorities for a cloud server, a few key deciding factors were consistent across those decisions:
If you're looking for a real-time example of cloud hosting, what better example can someone give other than Google itself? The king of search engines has got its resources spread over hundreds of servers on the cloud, no wonder you've never seen Google.com facing any downtimes over past decade or so (I don't remember seeing it down – planned maintenance of services like AdSense and AdWords are a different affair altogether!)
Cloud hosting, on the other hand, tackles the increase differently. Under the cloud environment, the website is hosted on a pool of unified computing resources. This simply means that if one server is reaching its optimum level, then a second server is ready to function. Similarly, if a server fails, the website will still be running as other servers will continue to serve the incoming traffic.
Cloud hosting is an alternative to hosting websites on single servers (either dedicated or shared servers) and can be considered as an extension of the concept of clustered hosting where websites are hosted on multiple servers. With cloud hosting, however, the network of servers that are used is vast and often pulled from different data centres in different locations.
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