Laura Bernheim has spent more than 12 years crafting engaging and award-winning articles that share the passion behind organizations' products, people, and innovations. As a contributor to HostingAdvice, she combines a reputation for producing quality content with rich technical expertise to show experienced developers how to capitalize on emerging technologies and find better ways to work with established platforms. A professional journalist, Laura has contributed to The New York Times, Sports Illustrated, the Sun Sentinel, and the world's top hosting providers. In addition to conducting interviews with industry leaders, Laura drives internal writing and design teams to deliver stellar, timely content that clearly explains even the most difficult concepts.
This approach to centralized administration aids both the service provider and users in defining, delivering, and tracking SLAs automatically on the web. Most cloud hosting services are provided through an easy-to-use, web-based user interface for software, hardware, and service requests, which are instantaneously delivered. Even the software and hardware updates can happen automatically. It is as easy as online shopping!
Data centers use from 1 to 2 percent of world’s electricity. And only around a quarter of our current energy is renewable - there are still plenty types of conventional power used in order to get electricity. Examples of such ways are coal, oil, gas or nuclear energy. In turn, this means that the more servers there are, the more electricity they use. Because most our energy comes from conventional sources, servers increase our carbon footprint. In fact, a CLEER model simulation (a tool by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Northwestern University) published in Scientific American reveals an interesting fact. If all US companies would move their spreadsheet, email apps, customer management software and similar programs to the cloud, that would save enough a lot of energy. How much exactly? Enough to fully power the city of Los Angeles!
You are responsible for your backups and web content. We create our own weekly backups of Cloud servers, and we can restore your web, email and database content from those per your request. However, this is NOT a procedure you should rely on to keep copies of your content safe; we recommend you make your own backups. You can take a backup from your cPanel.

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Cloud hosting, on the other hand, tackles the increase differently. Under the cloud environment, the website is hosted on a pool of unified computing resources. This simply means that if one server is reaching its optimum level, then a second server is ready to function. Similarly, if a server fails, the website will still be running as other servers will continue to serve the incoming traffic.
With cloud hosting, the load is balanced across a cluster of multiple servers. The information and applications contained on those servers are mirrored across the whole cluster, meaning that if an individual server goes down, there is no lost information or downtime. Because of this redundancy, cloud hosting is much more elastic and resilient. Problems with one website or application are unlikely to affect your bandwidth or performance.

There is a lot of talk these days about cloud computing or cloud hosting. Many companies are using these terms loosely to discuss either VPS or cloud servers (public or private). But, what do these terms mean? You will definitely see a difference when you look at the price tag, so understanding what each of these services are will help you in your quest to determine the best option for you or your company.

Back in the day, it was either shared or dedicated hosting. Many of the companies dependant on superior load times and in need of a lot of disk space have gone with dedicated hosting. It became their primary option. When cloud technologies started to develop, some people switched to cloud server hosting instead. Plenty of companies use cloud hosting without experiencing many problems. Dips in performance and unexpected downtimes, both fairly common in shared hosting, can be prevented here.

The hybrid model seems to be on trend with what’s happening in the IT industry in general. According to a recent Wall Street Journal article, tech’s future may lie in the “fog” rather than the cloud. In other words, cloud solutions are great, but businesses may not want to have everything “out there” in the cloud. Some solutions will still need to be kept in-house or on the device, closer to the ground. For many companies, the best configuration will be somewhere in between, which the article refers to as “the fog”.
While a "do-it-yourself" server usually provides you with a cheaper line item, you are also responsible for updating and patching your server every step of the way. All of our VPS plans include FREE server management, meaning that not only are cPanel licenses and operating system security layers included as part of your VPS Hosting plan, we will also update and patch them for you.

It all boils down to the amount of resources you require. If you've got a number of domains that have small numbers of pages, small load (low visitor numbers) and don't eat resources like a big ecommerce package (Magento for example), then shared or reseller plans might be all you need. When your visitor numbers, page numbers or application demands grow, it's time to move up to a VPS - either traditional SSD VPS or Cloud VPS. Speak with one of our sales reps who can help you look over what you've got, what you're trying to achieve, and put together a game plan that meets your needs and doesn't cost a fortune.
Back in the day, it was either shared or dedicated hosting. Many of the companies dependant on superior load times and in need of a lot of disk space have gone with dedicated hosting. It became their primary option. When cloud technologies started to develop, some people switched to cloud server hosting instead. Plenty of companies use cloud hosting without experiencing many problems. Dips in performance and unexpected downtimes, both fairly common in shared hosting, can be prevented here.

At the end of the day, you need a reliable VPS that stays online, doesn't crash, and isn't slow. Our next generation VPS platform is highly available. We achieve this through 2X hardware duplication and 3X data replication. That means that even if something happened to your node, or even our infrastructure, we automatically switch to a backup. Spend less time fighting your web hosting company, and more time building your projects.

The security of cloud hosting is also quite high. Your server is completely separated from other clients, as with a VPS. However, the web-based nature of the infrastructure might make it vulnerable to attacks since it is physically distributed and thus harder to secure. In addition, since the data is housed in many locations, it may not be possible to comply with some regulations on data security.
We use Ceph Storage, which gives 3N level of redundancy. In computing, Ceph is completely distributed without a single point of failure, scalable to the exabyte level, and freely available. Ceph replicates data and makes it fault-tolerant, requiring no specific hardware support. As a result of its design, the system is both self-healing and self-managing, aiming to minimize administration time and other costs.
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