Speaking of storage, we've discovered that cloud hosts typically offer hard drives or solid-state drives that range between 100GB and 200GB in size. That said, you'll occasionally discover a web host that boasts unlimited storage. (Again, the usual caveats apply with regards to "unlimited" anything.) Solid-state drives are typically faster than their hard-drive-based counterparts, but are typically smaller in terms of storage capacity. If you're looking for sheer volume, a traditional hard drive is the way to go.
With shared hosting, which is more common among small and medium sized businesses, the client pays for a set amount of space (storage) on a single server, and that server’s resources are shared by a number of other websites. It’s a cost-efficient, low-maintenance way to host a website or application, and the hosting company is responsible for managing, maintaining, and updating the units.

It only takes three letters to pique our interest in a particular hosting plan. SSD, which stands for solid-state drive, gives servers a performance and reliability boost that can’t be ignored. Yes, the upgraded option typically comes with a slightly higher price tag, but up to 20-times faster page loads make SSDs seem more than worthwhile. By including SSDs in their cloud network, hosting providers are showing a dedication to customer success and service that matters. Take a look at our top pick for SSD cloud hosting:

The biggest decision is whether to have a cloud-based or in-house server infrastructure. While it may sound like a black-or-white selection, there are many things to consider. The first factor is how important uptime is to your business. Cloud solutions are usually more expensive than in-house, but the benefits of being in the cloud can far outweigh the costs for some businesses. For example, an online business that is reliant on web-based transactions will consider uptime an extremely important factor; therefore, they will likely be willing to pay more for a cloud-based solution that can guarantee a certain level of uptime. Other businesses not as dependent on uptime may be more suited to an in-house set up.
The security of VPS hosting is almost on par with that of a dedicated physical server. The VPS is independent of any other VPSes on the same physical host, as if it were a separate machine, but poor security measures taken by the owner of one VPS could affect others on the same physical server. However, this possibility is much less likely than with shared hosting. The centralized location of the physical host offers added security to those operations with critical data whose location must be known and restricted to comply with data security regulations.
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