Laura Bernheim has spent more than 12 years crafting engaging and award-winning articles that share the passion behind organizations' products, people, and innovations. As a contributor to HostingAdvice, she combines a reputation for producing quality content with rich technical expertise to show experienced developers how to capitalize on emerging technologies and find better ways to work with established platforms. A professional journalist, Laura has contributed to The New York Times, Sports Illustrated, the Sun Sentinel, and the world's top hosting providers. In addition to conducting interviews with industry leaders, Laura drives internal writing and design teams to deliver stellar, timely content that clearly explains even the most difficult concepts.
One of the most popular hybrid cloud configurations is to use dedicated servers for back-end applications. The power of these servers creates the most robust environment for data storage and movement. The front-end is hosted on cloud servers. This configuration works well for Software as a Service (SaaS) applications, which require flexibility and scalability depending on customer-facing metrics.
The biggest difference between the two server environments is scale. If you’re looking to launch as quickly as possible and don’t care about scale, then a VPS server can be a great starting point. However, if you demand a flexible hosting setup and a high level of site performance and storage then it’s worth checking out a cloud hosting environment.
A cloud server is a virtual server (rather than a physical server) running in a cloud computing environment. It is built, hosted and delivered via a cloud computing platform via the internet, and can be accessed remotely. They are also known as virtual servers. Cloud servers have all the software they require to run and can function as independent units.
The hybrid model seems to be on trend with what’s happening in the IT industry in general. According to a recent Wall Street Journal article, tech’s future may lie in the “fog” rather than the cloud. In other words, cloud solutions are great, but businesses may not want to have everything “out there” in the cloud. Some solutions will still need to be kept in-house or on the device, closer to the ground. For many companies, the best configuration will be somewhere in between, which the article refers to as “the fog”.

Change is a good thing. Unfortunately, when you are making big changes to your site or application, there is always room for error. Live-state snapshots takes the idea of a "backup" and brings it forward to its next logical step. Taking a snapshot of your partition not only creates a backup of your files, but also all of the processes running in the background at that instant in time. This way, if you make an error or break something while making updates, you can revert your partition to that exact snapshot, providing a working, fail-safe rollback.


Yes! Thanks to the incredible performance of KVM technology, OpenStack, and Ceph. Where a traditional VPS would rely on a half-dozen or more RAID drives locally (all SSD), it doesn't handle as many IOPS as the massively parallel handling of Ceph distributed storage. While 6 RAID SSD drives can be very, very fast, when it comes to larger numbers of accounts on a box - Ceph creates a gigantic pooled pipeline to assorted SSD's, perhaps hundreds, in order to make transfers at a blistering pace.
Rather than being hosted on one single instances of a physical server, hosting is delivered on a virtual partition which draws its resource, such as disk space, from an extensive network of underlying physical servers. If one server goes offline it will have no effect on availability, as the virtual servers will continue to pull resource from the remaining network of servers. 
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