The biggest decision is whether to have a cloud-based or in-house server infrastructure. While it may sound like a black-or-white selection, there are many things to consider. The first factor is how important uptime is to your business. Cloud solutions are usually more expensive than in-house, but the benefits of being in the cloud can far outweigh the costs for some businesses. For example, an online business that is reliant on web-based transactions will consider uptime an extremely important factor; therefore, they will likely be willing to pay more for a cloud-based solution that can guarantee a certain level of uptime. Other businesses not as dependent on uptime may be more suited to an in-house set up.
Cloud server hosting offers the advantages of increased accessibility and reliability, seamless scalability and potential cost savings, as customers are freed from having to invest in on-premises servers and hardware, and they pay only for the resources they consume.  On the other hand, security and lack of access and full control are potential concerns with cloud server hosting.
Laura Bernheim has spent more than 12 years crafting engaging and award-winning articles that share the passion behind organizations' products, people, and innovations. As a contributor to HostingAdvice, she combines a reputation for producing quality content with rich technical expertise to show experienced developers how to capitalize on emerging technologies and find better ways to work with established platforms. A professional journalist, Laura has contributed to The New York Times, Sports Illustrated, the Sun Sentinel, and the world's top hosting providers. In addition to conducting interviews with industry leaders, Laura drives internal writing and design teams to deliver stellar, timely content that clearly explains even the most difficult concepts.
Arubacloud.com is a brand belonging to the Aruba group: your personal and administrative data is managed in Europe, in accordance with European legislation. Aruba uses it exclusively to provide the services you have purchased. Your data is not sold to third parties, because our business is to provide cloud services, not to commercialize our customers' data.
The security of VPS hosting is almost on par with that of a dedicated physical server. The VPS is independent of any other VPSes on the same physical host, as if it were a separate machine, but poor security measures taken by the owner of one VPS could affect others on the same physical server. However, this possibility is much less likely than with shared hosting. The centralized location of the physical host offers added security to those operations with critical data whose location must be known and restricted to comply with data security regulations.
AWS Lambda receives the cleaning mission metadata and parses the format to Amazon DynamoDB. Amazon Kinesis batches the mission data and stores it in Amazon S3. Amazon S3 is used as the iRobot data lake for analytics, where all message data is compressed and stored. Once the data is in Amazon S3, iRobot uses the AWS Analytics toolset. Amazon Athena allows iRobot to explore and discover patterns in the data without having to run compute resources all the time.
“Guaranteed uptime” is one of the most common buzzwords in the business. Most (if not all) hosting providers offer uptimes of 99.9% and higher. Some cloud hosting companies, like A2 hosting, for example, genuinely deliver on their promises. Yet still, it's important to know how downtimes work.  This convenient chart shows, how often your website can still go down with the provider’s “guaranteed uptime”.

Varnish cache is a web application accelerator that can speed up your website by up to 1000 percent. Varnish is mostly used for content heavy websites. Caching is used by the top 10k websites with high-traffic including Wikipedia and many online news sites such as The New York Times, The Hindu, The Guardian, etc. It is also used by social and content sites such as Facebook, Twitter, Vimeo, and Tumblr.

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