Cloud hosting sometimes gets confused with a virtual private server, or VPS. Both configurations rely on the virtualization of physical server resources. Although a cloud server can be called a VPS, a VPS is not a cloud server. One of the key differences, aside from the infrastructure configurations, is the payment model — the automation and vast network associated with cloud hosting enables providers to offer cheaper, pay-as-you-go solutions that can be scaled up or down at a moment’s notice.

With cloud hosting, the load is balanced across a cluster of multiple servers. The information and applications contained on those servers are mirrored across the whole cluster, meaning that if an individual server goes down, there is no lost information or downtime. Because of this redundancy, cloud hosting is much more elastic and resilient. Problems with one website or application are unlikely to affect your bandwidth or performance.


If you currently have web hosting with another provider and are looking to move to InMotion Hosting, we can assist you with your website migration! If your current host uses cPanel, we can transfer up to 30 cPanels under 5GB completely free of cost. This transfer includes websites, databases and emails. For every cPanel or database over 30, or for cPanels over 5GB in size, we have a point system, with each additional website and database equating to 1 point. Each point over the limit costs $10/point.
The biggest decision is whether to have a cloud-based or in-house server infrastructure. While it may sound like a black-or-white selection, there are many things to consider. The first factor is how important uptime is to your business. Cloud solutions are usually more expensive than in-house, but the benefits of being in the cloud can far outweigh the costs for some businesses. For example, an online business that is reliant on web-based transactions will consider uptime an extremely important factor; therefore, they will likely be willing to pay more for a cloud-based solution that can guarantee a certain level of uptime. Other businesses not as dependent on uptime may be more suited to an in-house set up.
Three years ago, we added formal uptime monitoring to our review process, and the results show that most web hosts do an excellent job of keeping their sites up and running. If they don't, they suffer for it in our rankings. Even if they get everything else right, sites with uptime problems aren't eligible for top scores. All services suffer ups and downs, sometimes for reasons beyond their control. Those sites that fail to address the problem are penalized accordingly.
4 The amount of aggregate outbound bandwidth across all attached network interfaces (PublicNet, ServiceNet, Cloud Networks). The maximum amount of outbound public Internet bandwidth is limited to 50% of the aggregate limit. Inbound traffic is not limited. Host networking is redundant and bandwidth is delivered over two separate bonded interfaces, each able to carry 50% of the aggregate limit. We recommend using multiple Layer 4 connections to maximize throughput.

The biggest decision is whether to have a cloud-based or in-house server infrastructure. While it may sound like a black-or-white selection, there are many things to consider. The first factor is how important uptime is to your business. Cloud solutions are usually more expensive than in-house, but the benefits of being in the cloud can far outweigh the costs for some businesses. For example, an online business that is reliant on web-based transactions will consider uptime an extremely important factor; therefore, they will likely be willing to pay more for a cloud-based solution that can guarantee a certain level of uptime. Other businesses not as dependent on uptime may be more suited to an in-house set up.
A hybrid server model also gives companies greater data security. For example, with a SysGen hybrid model, clients can back up their data to an onsite server as well as a cloud solution. SysGen’s backup solution partner, Datto, introduces next-gen backup, disaster recovery, and business continuity solutions. Read more about backup solutions in our blog post, “Five key questions to ask about your backup solution”.
Our VPS Hosting plans all come with a high availability feature that essentially takes your VPS container, and empowers it with a cloud infrastructure. How does this work? We put a premium on your server's uptime, so we created an infrastructure of redundant hardware clusters that provides your partition with real-time redundancy. If for some reason there is an error on your server, there is another server in the cluster with that backup information ready to spin up. We utilize Virtuozzo, a virtualization solution built on top of OpenVZ.

Because Cloud VPS is an unmanaged VPS, it requires your own maintenance and setup. We highly suggest this product to those already comfortable with Linux and the command line. Not sure if this is what you need or worried about missing a control panel? Start a conversation with one of our Linux hosting experts and they'll point you in the right direction.

Three years ago, we added formal uptime monitoring to our review process, and the results show that most web hosts do an excellent job of keeping their sites up and running. If they don't, they suffer for it in our rankings. Even if they get everything else right, sites with uptime problems aren't eligible for top scores. All services suffer ups and downs, sometimes for reasons beyond their control. Those sites that fail to address the problem are penalized accordingly.
Customization with VPS hosting is very similar to that of a dedicated server. You have full root access with complete control over the OS as well as the website and all software. You can customize and configure as desired, as if you had a separate server. Each physical host system can run only one operating system, so your choice of OS may be limited if the hosting company only runs one type of virtual hosting machine. Linux systems are generally more common than Windows systems for this type of hosting.
Rather than being hosted on one single instances of a physical server, hosting is delivered on a virtual partition which draws its resource, such as disk space, from an extensive network of underlying physical servers. If one server goes offline it will have no effect on availability, as the virtual servers will continue to pull resource from the remaining network of servers. 
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