The hybrid model seems to be on trend with what’s happening in the IT industry in general. According to a recent Wall Street Journal article, tech’s future may lie in the “fog” rather than the cloud. In other words, cloud solutions are great, but businesses may not want to have everything “out there” in the cloud. Some solutions will still need to be kept in-house or on the device, closer to the ground. For many companies, the best configuration will be somewhere in between, which the article refers to as “the fog”.

What is cloud hosting going to be like in the future? We can only predict it’s going to be even more popular than it is now. As we speak, it is currently taking over the world. Cloud-based IT solutions are becoming more and more popular around the world. Cloud server hosting is an upgrade of the regular shared hosting. Compared to that, it is quicker, more efficient and easily allows you to get as many resources as you need. In some cases, it may even be a better choice than dedicated server hosting. It offers superior resources and flexibility for a very small price. Its key ability to store the information in multiple data centers worldwide makes it quick, safe, reliable and efficient. Of course, you can still improve cloud server hosting. But what the providers are currently offering is really interesting. We do plenty of web hosting reviews, and in our searches, discovered plenty of amazing companies which offers cloud servers as well. If what you heard today has made you interested, be sure to check them out.
As you can see, there are many pros and cons of each setup. For this reason, SysGen often recommends a hybrid model to clients – meaning a combination of both in-house and cloud-based solutions. Going hybrid gives clients the best of both worlds. Having some in-house server hardware can be suitable for companies that do not want to rely on the Internet. And at the same time, businesses can reap the benefits of a cloud solution, such as Microsoft Exchange email, to allow users to connect from anywhere with a high degree of uptime. SysGen actually guarantees 99.99% uptime to its clients with cloud-based email.

If you're looking for a real-time example of cloud hosting, what better example can someone give other than Google itself? The king of search engines has got its resources spread over hundreds of servers on the cloud, no wonder you've never seen Google.com facing any downtimes over past decade or so (I don't remember seeing it down – planned maintenance of services like AdSense and AdWords are a different affair altogether!)


Most dedicated hosting solutions are fixed on resource availability acting like a cap on your website growth. Our cloud-based servers free you from the limits of a bare-metal server by providing completely scalable environment allowing you to easily upgrade or downgrade your server resources to simultaneously meet your website demands, reduce cost and address temporary traffic spikes.
As Microsoft Azure becomes an increasingly popular cloud choice, there is growing evidence on how enterprises can increase the value they gain from Azure. In this guide for migrating to Azure, Navisite has identified 12 key learnings from scores of Azure deployments. Discover the steps to avoid common migration pitfalls and achieve the right level of transparency and control when working … Continue Reading...
Having a solid backup strategy is important but maintaining and monitoring your backups can be a time consuming and complicated matter. We offload this tedious work from you by managing the entire process - from making sure your backup is executed on schedule to monitoring the health of the backup system. We will perform daily and weekly backups of your websites files, databases and emails as well as full snapshots of your system so it can be safely restored if needed.
The biggest decision is whether to have a cloud-based or in-house server infrastructure. While it may sound like a black-or-white selection, there are many things to consider. The first factor is how important uptime is to your business. Cloud solutions are usually more expensive than in-house, but the benefits of being in the cloud can far outweigh the costs for some businesses. For example, an online business that is reliant on web-based transactions will consider uptime an extremely important factor; therefore, they will likely be willing to pay more for a cloud-based solution that can guarantee a certain level of uptime. Other businesses not as dependent on uptime may be more suited to an in-house set up.
Powering 28% of the internet, WordPress provides the backend interface for more than 60 million bloggers, entrepreneurs, developers, and enterprise businesses. Given the platform’s wide applications, cloud hosting is a perfect fit for highly trafficked, in-demand websites and online stores. InMotion Hosting, our favorite option for all things WordPress, understandably outperforms competitors in terms of optimized infrastructure, superior management, and ultimate usability:
With cloud hosting, the load is balanced across a cluster of multiple servers. The information and applications contained on those servers are mirrored across the whole cluster, meaning that if an individual server goes down, there is no lost information or downtime. Because of this redundancy, cloud hosting is much more elastic and resilient. Problems with one website or application are unlikely to affect your bandwidth or performance.
Cloud hosting truly shines in its ability to scale. Essentially you’ll have an entire network or servers to tap at a moments notice for additional storage, or to meet rising traffic needs. Also, due to the high availability of servers, you’ll have very high uptime and great performance. If a physical server failure ever occurs then your site will be switched to another server.
These services allow our customers to build a solution that addresses multiple IT requirements and to take advantage of all that secure cloud hosting has to offer. In addition, our professional services team helps empower companies – because managed cloud hosting is more than maintaining operations; it’s about business cloud solutions that help companies design, build, migrate, manage and protect data assets throughout the cloud lifecycle.
A cloud server is a virtual server (rather than a physical server) running in a cloud computing environment. It is built, hosted and delivered via a cloud computing platform via the internet, and can be accessed remotely. They are also known as virtual servers. Cloud servers have all the software they require to run and can function as independent units.
As a developer, you know there can be a lot of trial and error as you write code, develop sites and build software. Sometimes mistakes happen. It happens to the best of us! That's why you can rest assure because your account is backed by our 99.9% Uptime Commitment. That means you get ultimate peace of mind in addition to the best in hosting dependability.
VPS hosting has a limit to scaling depending on the physical host machine. You have access to some extra memory and CPU power above and beyond the amount dedicated to your virtual machine, but the physical host has a fixed amount that it can deliver. If you need more, you will have to get a new plan and may experience downtime while you migrate to a new solution.

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Windows servers feature an easy-to-use interface using remote desktop access. You will need Windows hosting if you use Microsoft technologies such as ASP, ASP.NET, FrontPage, or MSSQL. It is easier to manage multiple websites using Windows. However, since Windows is a proprietary system with licensing fees, the hosting plans tend to be more expensive. Windows virtual machines are also known to place heavier demand on the physical host system.
Here’s an example of a SysGen hybrid model. As you can see, the client has an onsite server with local backup storage. Employees access their desktops, applications, files, printers, and email from the office using the local network. At the same time, data is backed up for redundancy to a cloud-based solution, and email is entirely in the cloud with Hosted Microsoft Exchange. The cloud configuration also gives employees anywhere access to their desktops, applications, files, printers, and email. (Click the photo to enlarge it).
4 The amount of aggregate outbound bandwidth across all attached network interfaces (PublicNet, ServiceNet, Cloud Networks). The maximum amount of outbound public Internet bandwidth is limited to 50% of the aggregate limit. Inbound traffic is not limited. Host networking is redundant and bandwidth is delivered over two separate bonded interfaces, each able to carry 50% of the aggregate limit. We recommend using multiple Layer 4 connections to maximize throughput.
A cloud server is primarily an Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) based cloud service model. There are two types of cloud server: logical and physical. A cloud server is considered to be logical when it is delivered through server virtualization. In this delivery model, the physical server is logically distributed into two or more logical servers, each of which has a separate OS, user interface and apps, although they share physical components from the underlying physical server. 

Cloud hosting is a network of servers in multiple locations, which share data and resources among themselves. That reduces server load and increases performance. As the demand rises, clients can easily scale their plans. By doing so, they increase the performance of their cloud hosting in just a few clicks. Now, it’s quickly becoming more and more popular.
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