It all boils down to the amount of resources you require. If you've got a number of domains that have small numbers of pages, small load (low visitor numbers) and don't eat resources like a big ecommerce package (Magento for example), then shared or reseller plans might be all you need. When your visitor numbers, page numbers or application demands grow, it's time to move up to a VPS - either traditional SSD VPS or Cloud VPS. Speak with one of our sales reps who can help you look over what you've got, what you're trying to achieve, and put together a game plan that meets your needs and doesn't cost a fortune.
Back in the day, it was either shared or dedicated hosting. Many of the companies dependant on superior load times and in need of a lot of disk space have gone with dedicated hosting. It became their primary option. When cloud technologies started to develop, some people switched to cloud server hosting instead. Plenty of companies use cloud hosting without experiencing many problems. Dips in performance and unexpected downtimes, both fairly common in shared hosting, can be prevented here.
If the plan looks good, check the experience and responsiveness of the support staff. The server could be cheap because the provider doesn’t hire enough support staff or pay well enough to attract top talent. Finally, check to be sure the plan is truly cloud or VPS hosting and not shared hosting disguised by marketing hype. The attributes we have described above should help you detect any impostors. The host below consistently delivers value to hosting customers, and its cloud VPS plans are no exception.
Processors in dedicated servers are entirely devoted to the host website or application. Unless all of the processing power is used at once (which is highly unlikely), they do not need to queue requests. This makes dedicated servers an excellent choice for companies with CPU intensive load balancing functions. In a cloud environment, processor cores require management to keep performance from degrading. The current generation of hypervisors cannot manage requests without an added level of latency.

Change is a good thing. Unfortunately, when you are making big changes to your site or application, there is always room for error. Live-state snapshots takes the idea of a "backup" and brings it forward to its next logical step. Taking a snapshot of your partition not only creates a backup of your files, but also all of the processes running in the background at that instant in time. This way, if you make an error or break something while making updates, you can revert your partition to that exact snapshot, providing a working, fail-safe rollback.


AWS offers its Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) to handle compute services, along with Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3) and Amazon Glacier for storage. Google offers its Google Compute Engine (GCE) and Google Cloud Storage for the enterprise. Microsoft Azure provides Azure Virtual Machines and Azure Virtual Machine Scale Sets, and its storage includes blob, file and queue storage. Its Microsoft Office 365 is a popular cloud service.
Traditional hosting, especially shared hosting, has its drawbacks though. Because the resources of a single server are shared among a number of different websites, spikes in traffic to those websites can mean decreased performance for your own. Security breaches and other performance issues on other sites make take yours down as well. And there’s a single point of failure. If the server itself experiences technical problems, everyone hosted on that server will be affected.
Cloud computing offers users a level of hardware abstraction that means they don't have to worry about all the operational aspects of a datacentre. Hardware is provided and maintained by OVH. As a user, you don't need to deal with stock problems, parts that need replacing or the fluctuating cost of hardware. Forget about infrastructure management and concentrate on developing your business while OVH will take care of the rest.
The biggest difference between the two server environments is scale. If you’re looking to launch as quickly as possible and don’t care about scale, then a VPS server can be a great starting point. However, if you demand a flexible hosting setup and a high level of site performance and storage then it’s worth checking out a cloud hosting environment.

Customization with cloud hosting expands to include the possibility to tweak network architecture, firewalls, load balancing, and IP addresses. However, the need to distribute functioning across many servers may leave less control over some hosting settings. Both Windows and Linux clouds are readily available, so you will get your choice of OS. Because a cloud environment is more complex, it may require more technical expertise to configure, especially to gain the full advantages of the cloud network.

For more than a decade, Jeffrey L. Wilson has penned gadget- and video game-related nerd-copy for a variety of publications, including 1UP, 2D-X, The Cask, Laptop, LifeStyler, Parenting, Sync, Wise Bread, and WWE. He now brings his knowledge and skillset to PCMag as Senior Analyst. When he isn't staring at a monitor (or two) and churning out web... See Full Bio
Cloud hosting refers primarily to the use of virtual hardware, network, storage and composite solutions from a cloud vendor. It is enabled through virtualization, whereby the entire computing capacity of an infrastructure or data center is distributed and delivered to multiple users simultaneously. The user uses underlying infrastructure to host its own applications, services and data. For example, a physical server can be virtualized and consolidated to host several cloud servers, all sharing the processor, memory, storage, network and other resources.
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