In the Cloud, there is an option to integrate additional resources if needed. RAM, disc space, or bandwidth, etc., can be added with few clicks and dismissed when no longer needed without financial loss. Thus, Cloud hosting can also be defined as a web hosting solution that provides resources on demand. It is dynamically scalable and customizable according to the needs of the customer. No large investments are required. Unnecessary resources can be removed without any cancellation or further fees.

Traditional hosting sees your website leverage the power of one particular server's CPU, RAM, storage, and data transfers. For example, shared web hosting has your website share resources with other sites that are also hosted exclusively on one server. The result is many annoying limitations in terms of power, and the inability to handle sharp traffic surges. For better service, you can pay for a virtual private server, or even a dedicated server of varying power. In all these case, you're basically relying on one server, and that's it. Cloud hosting, however, kicks that single-server hosting model to the curb in a marvelous manner. With cloud hosting, your website draws resources from multiple servers.


The common pricing model in cloud hosting is to pay as you go without large upfront costs. Be wary of any plan or hosting company that seems to buck this trend. Inquire about the security of the datacenters that house the servers. One study found that one third of data breaches involved some compromise of physical security. The decentralized nature of cloud hosting makes data security more complicated. Be sure that the network you will be using is compliant with regulations such as PCI DSS and HIPAA. Look for third-party audits to confirm this.

The chart above focuses on the web hosts that boast the best cloud hosting plans of all the services we've reviewed. Note that we are still in the process of examining cloud hosting offerings as this is a new category—we're definitely going to be testing more services in the coming months. Still, with the reviews we've done so far and lots of research, we've discovered what you should look for in a cloud hosting service.


Data centers use from 1 to 2 percent of world’s electricity. And only around a quarter of our current energy is renewable - there are still plenty types of conventional power used in order to get electricity. Examples of such ways are coal, oil, gas or nuclear energy. In turn, this means that the more servers there are, the more electricity they use. Because most our energy comes from conventional sources, servers increase our carbon footprint. In fact, a CLEER model simulation (a tool by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Northwestern University) published in Scientific American reveals an interesting fact. If all US companies would move their spreadsheet, email apps, customer management software and similar programs to the cloud, that would save enough a lot of energy. How much exactly? Enough to fully power the city of Los Angeles!


This approach to centralized administration aids both the service provider and users in defining, delivering, and tracking SLAs automatically on the web. Most cloud hosting services are provided through an easy-to-use, web-based user interface for software, hardware, and service requests, which are instantaneously delivered. Even the software and hardware updates can happen automatically. It is as easy as online shopping!
Cloud Hosting is a new form of web hosting that has gained great popularity in recent years. The fundamental idea behind Cloud Hosting is 'Divide and Rule' - a virtualization layer allows for separation of resources required by the server across instances and/or devices and this connected entity is known as a ‘Cloud’. This design allows Cloud to scale & offers greater protection from isolated device failures.
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