InMotion Hosting's Virtual Private Servers are now using Solid State Drives (SSDs), a type of hard drive that uses no mechanical parts and provides substantial performance upgrades from traditional spinning drives. Solid State Drives give you faster read/write speeds, can handle more disk requests and can push through significantly more data than a standard Hard Disk Drive (HDD).
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Yes! Thanks to the incredible performance of KVM technology, OpenStack, and Ceph. Where a traditional VPS would rely on a half-dozen or more RAID drives locally (all SSD), it doesn't handle as many IOPS as the massively parallel handling of Ceph distributed storage. While 6 RAID SSD drives can be very, very fast, when it comes to larger numbers of accounts on a box - Ceph creates a gigantic pooled pipeline to assorted SSD's, perhaps hundreds, in order to make transfers at a blistering pace.


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VPS hosting assures a fixed level of performance because a guaranteed level of system resources is dedicated to your virtual server. However, high demand by your server or another virtual server on the same physical host may impact performance if you both need the extra resources at the same time, or if your server needs more than the physical host can provide.
Cloud hosting is the hot darling in the web hosting space right now. This hosting category has been around for a while, but recently has really started to gain traction, even among smaller businesses. Cloud hosting—which spreads your site across multiple servers—is the most unique of all hosting types, as it lets you do many things that you could not do with the standard shared, virtual private server (VPS), dedicated, or WordPress hosting options. Let's explore those features.

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Traditional hosting, especially shared hosting, has its drawbacks though. Because the resources of a single server are shared among a number of different websites, spikes in traffic to those websites can mean decreased performance for your own. Security breaches and other performance issues on other sites make take yours down as well. And there’s a single point of failure. If the server itself experiences technical problems, everyone hosted on that server will be affected.
An increasingly popular configuration that many companies are using is called a “hybrid cloud.” A hybrid cloud uses dedicated and cloud hosting solutions. A hybrid may also mix private and public cloud servers with colocated servers. This configuration allows for multiple variations on the customization side which is attractive to businesses that have specific needs or budgetary constraints.
Rather than being hosted on one single instances of a physical server, hosting is delivered on a virtual partition which draws its resource, such as disk space, from an extensive network of underlying physical servers. If one server goes offline it will have no effect on availability, as the virtual servers will continue to pull resource from the remaining network of servers. 
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