For more than a decade, Jeffrey L. Wilson has penned gadget- and video game-related nerd-copy for a variety of publications, including 1UP, 2D-X, The Cask, Laptop, LifeStyler, Parenting, Sync, Wise Bread, and WWE. He now brings his knowledge and skillset to PCMag as Lead Analyst. When he isn't staring at a monitor (or two) and churning out web h... See Full Bio
Alexandra Leslie’s interest in website administration was sparked in her teens, priming her for a fast-paced career in managing, building, and contributing to online brands, including HostingAdvice, Forbes, and the blogs of prominent hosting providers. She brings to the table firsthand experience in reviewing web hosts, perfecting website design, optimizing content, and walking site owners through the steps that add up to a successful online presence. Today, she combines her extensive writing experience with technical understanding to unpack some of the most complex topics that daunt novice website owners, as well as the subjects that excite veteran technologists within the HostingAdvice readership.
The server must be able to handle a lot of visitors when your website experiences increased traffic. Online shops, for instance, tend to place high demands on the stability of server capacities. Many shop owners in the eCommerce segment prefer to know that their customer data is hosted on a server that is not shared with others. A dedicated server with “genuine” root access is the better choice in these cases. Moreover, a dedicated server offers more web server options.
Advertiser Disclosure: Some of the products that appear on this site are from companies from which QuinStreet receives compensation. This compensation may impact how and where products appear on this site including, for example, the order in which they appear. QuinStreet does not include all companies or all types of products available in the marketplace.
Your Dedicated Server means you are essentially renting a server within our data center configured specifically to your needs. Dedicated Web Hosting is designed for the most intensive hosting needs including successful business sites, multimedia sites and sites that use the web's most demanding software solutions. In short, it's perfect for hosting your high traffic and high load web site.

The server must be able to handle a lot of visitors when your website experiences increased traffic. Online shops, for instance, tend to place high demands on the stability of server capacities. Many shop owners in the eCommerce segment prefer to know that their customer data is hosted on a server that is not shared with others. A dedicated server with “genuine” root access is the better choice in these cases. Moreover, a dedicated server offers more web server options.


Ample RAM (5GB or more), e-commerce options for selling products, 24/7 customer service, and unlimited monthly data transfers are highly sought-after features, too. Many web hosts cap their dedicated monthly data transfer offerings at 16GB, which is probably fine for most users. Some web hosts offer unlimited monthly data transfers, but they are few and far between, and you need to read the terms of service very carefully to understand just what "unlimited" means to the host in question. In addition, companies that offer dedicated web hosting typically offer daily backups, security options, and malware detection and removal—all very important factors in your website's day-to-day operation.
Hosts like InMotion Hosting, for example, pack plenty of RAM, CPU power, storage, and allocated IP addresses into each dedicated server plan, and package pricing starts right around $100 a month. No, this is not the lowest price tag you’ll find in the hosting market, but remember, dedicated hosting is the expensive hosting niche. You’re not sharing any of your server’s compute power or storage or bandwidth with anyone else, so you’re the only one paying for it all.
Managed hosting minimizes the amount of hands-on IT work you have to do. The level of management can vary from provider to provider. Some hosts offer your choice of semi- or fully managed services — and one host’s fully managed plan may be entirely different than another provider’s. All in all, management services may include hardware monitoring, software updates, security patches, and bug fixes.
Alexandra Leslie’s interest in website administration was sparked in her teens, priming her for a fast-paced career in managing, building, and contributing to online brands, including HostingAdvice, Forbes, and the blogs of prominent hosting providers. She brings to the table firsthand experience in reviewing web hosts, perfecting website design, optimizing content, and walking site owners through the steps that add up to a successful online presence. Today, she combines her extensive writing experience with technical understanding to unpack some of the most complex topics that daunt novice website owners, as well as the subjects that excite veteran technologists within the HostingAdvice readership.
Companies who run physical servers for their IT infrastructure regularly face the problem of having to replace their hardware bit by bit. The risks associated with computing power, storage space, security, and service life can be predicted more or less accurately. This is why more and more companies are starting to migrate parts or all of their IT infrastructure to the cloud. The Enterprise Cloud can create a precise replica of your current on-premises IT architecture in the cloud—IaaS the way it’s meant to be.
Bandwidth consumption over the last several years has shifted from a per megabit usage model to a per gigabyte usage model. Bandwidth was traditionally measured in line speed access that included the ability to purchase needed megabits at a given monthly cost. As the shared hosting model developed, the trend towards gigabyte or total bytes transferred, replaced the megabit line speed model so dedicated server providers started offering per gigabyte.
Ample RAM (5GB or more), e-commerce options for selling products, 24/7 customer service, and unlimited monthly data transfers are highly sought-after features, too. Many web hosts cap their dedicated monthly data transfer offerings at 16GB, which is probably fine for most users. Some web hosts offer unlimited monthly data transfers, but they are few and far between, and you need to read the terms of service very carefully to understand just what "unlimited" means to the host in question. In addition, companies that offer dedicated web hosting typically offer daily backups, security options, and malware detection and removal—all very important factors in your website's day-to-day operation.
Launching a business-focused website is not a simple task, as you must build your online destination with commerce, search engine optimization, security, and other factors in mind. For a rock-solid website foundation that can withstand high traffic volumes and let you install your own scripts, however, a dedicated server is an easy choice—if you can afford one.
For more than a decade, Jeffrey L. Wilson has penned gadget- and video game-related nerd-copy for a variety of publications, including 1UP, 2D-X, The Cask, Laptop, LifeStyler, Parenting, Sync, Wise Bread, and WWE. He now brings his knowledge and skillset to PCMag as Lead Analyst. When he isn't staring at a monitor (or two) and churning out web h... See Full Bio 

Availability, price and employee familiarity often determines which operating systems are offered on dedicated servers. Variations of Linux and Unix (open source operating systems) are often included at no charge to the customer. Commercial operating systems include Microsoft Windows Server, provided through a special program called Microsoft SPLA. Red Hat Enterprise is a commercial version of Linux offered to hosting providers on a monthly fee basis. The monthly fee provides OS updates through the Red Hat Network using an application called Yum. Other operating systems are available from the open source community at no charge. These include CentOS, Fedora Core, Debian, and many other Linux distributions or BSD systems FreeBSD, NetBSD, OpenBSD.
×