A cloud server is primarily an Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) based cloud service model. There are two types of cloud server: logical and physical. A cloud server is considered to be logical when it is delivered through server virtualization. In this delivery model, the physical server is logically distributed into two or more logical servers, each of which has a separate OS, user interface and apps, although they share physical components from the underlying physical server.
A Cloud VPS is to all effects a virtual server that is activated within Aruba's Cloud infrastructure. Cloud VPS is an incredibly convenient solution that lets you activate one or more servers in just a few easy steps. You can choose from 4 sizes and many templates and preconfigured operating systems that are all ready to use. The Windows Server license is included in the price of the server.
These services allow our customers to build a solution that addresses multiple IT requirements and to take advantage of all that secure cloud hosting has to offer. In addition, our professional services team helps empower companies – because managed cloud hosting is more than maintaining operations; it’s about business cloud solutions that help companies design, build, migrate, manage and protect data assets throughout the cloud lifecycle.
Your Virtual Private Server is automatically provisioned with your choice of CentOS or Ubuntu, and a firewall. No more software overhead, no more slow servers. That means that you have total control and freedom to customize, optimize, and set up your VPS server to your exact needs. Whether you want Apache, NGINX, PHP, MySQL, custom services, or anything else, you're able to do so with our Cloud VPS servers.
AWS offers its Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) to handle compute services, along with Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3) and Amazon Glacier for storage. Google offers its Google Compute Engine (GCE) and Google Cloud Storage for the enterprise. Microsoft Azure provides Azure Virtual Machines and Azure Virtual Machine Scale Sets, and its storage includes blob, file and queue storage. Its Microsoft Office 365 is a popular cloud service.
Traditional hosting sees your website leverage the power of one particular server's CPU, RAM, storage, and data transfers. For example, shared web hosting has your website share resources with other sites that are also hosted exclusively on one server. The result is many annoying limitations in terms of power, and the inability to handle sharp traffic surges. For better service, you can pay for a virtual private server, or even a dedicated server of varying power. In all these case, you're basically relying on one server, and that's it. Cloud hosting, however, kicks that single-server hosting model to the curb in a marvelous manner. With cloud hosting, your website draws resources from multiple servers.
“Guaranteed uptime” is one of the most common buzzwords in the business. Most (if not all) hosting providers offer uptimes of 99.9% and higher. Some cloud hosting companies, like A2 hosting, for example, genuinely deliver on their promises. Yet still, it's important to know how downtimes work.  This convenient chart shows, how often your website can still go down with the provider’s “guaranteed uptime”.
Currently, cloud hosting is too technical for an average Joe or Jane to comprehend. People want to deploy their websites but they do not want it to be a headache. This is where Cloudways WordPress cloud hosting comes into play. Our cloud hosting platform provides you the ease to launch websites on any of the six different open-source applications within minutes. Our powerful console allows you to monitor 15+ server and application related metrics.
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Cloud hosting provides significant capital and operational savings to organizations because they don't have to spend a lot on the initial upfront capital cost associated with owning and managing data centers. IT also has the ability to scale more efficiently, using and paying only for the resources they need. In addition, long-term data retention becomes a more simplified process, eliminating the costly management of disks and tape systems.

The biggest decision is whether to have a cloud-based or in-house server infrastructure. While it may sound like a black-or-white selection, there are many things to consider. The first factor is how important uptime is to your business. Cloud solutions are usually more expensive than in-house, but the benefits of being in the cloud can far outweigh the costs for some businesses. For example, an online business that is reliant on web-based transactions will consider uptime an extremely important factor; therefore, they will likely be willing to pay more for a cloud-based solution that can guarantee a certain level of uptime. Other businesses not as dependent on uptime may be more suited to an in-house set up.

Cloud hosting refers primarily to the use of virtual hardware, network, storage and composite solutions from a cloud vendor. It is enabled through virtualization, whereby the entire computing capacity of an infrastructure or data center is distributed and delivered to multiple users simultaneously. The user uses underlying infrastructure to host its own applications, services and data. For example, a physical server can be virtualized and consolidated to host several cloud servers, all sharing the processor, memory, storage, network and other resources.
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